Anyone Can Bait a Hook

But it takes a fisherman to catch a fish.

Writing a novel or non-fiction title requires a bit of psychology if you want to catch a reader.

I think it is easy to believe that you can pen a novel, put it on Amazon for millions of readers and think you won’t miss one. Like I said, anyone can bait a hook.

Readers are like fish and right now, it is a reader’s world. There is no shortage of books out there just waiting to be read. With that much bait floating around, reader’s can afford to be picky.

As an author, you will have to be clever if you want to offer the right bait to the right readers for your novel. Otherwise, your title will float around in the water until it falls off the hook and floats to the bottom. Forgotten.

When I took a non-fiction writing class, one exercise included imagining what your reader looks like. Imagine them perusing the web or cruising through the bookstore. How will you snag their attention?

Knowing what your reader looks like will help with the plot, the book-cover, and the marketing. If you design a plot that would attract two different styles of reader from opposite sides of the personality-spectrum, your book will hang in the balance.

Here is an example – The novel you wrote is psychological fiction with a real gory bent. Your characters are complex and the plot is like a puzzle the reader will have to put together. . .then you add green slime coming out of the walls and when the characters go outside, they burst into flames or explode with their entrails flying everywhere.

Think about my example and imagine which kind of reader your book will attract. The thought I wanted to convey-your reader will be split in two – one loves the mystery and psychological complexities but what does green slime and exploding bodies have to do with it? That reader moves on. On the other hand, someone who loves reading about mysterious happenings creating a world where we have to start over – they will love the atmosphere blowing up humans and how they survive. The psychological puzzles may turn that reader off.

There will always be a few readers who will like both ends of the spectrum in my example but that is the point. A few. Sales for a few will not sustain you and it might not be a real motivator for a second novel.

Writing for fish that swim in different schools and waters will make it difficult to sell your novel. Be more cognitive of your plot and characters. My example could easily be made into two novels if the writer imagined which fish he wanted to catch before writing.

Give more thought to the readers your book will attract and market where they congregate. The easiest chance to catch a fish is to drop the appropriate bait into a school. You will still have competitive bait but at least you can catch a good haul of your own and most of all, know you are fishing in the right waters.

By: Lily Gianna Woodmansee – Executive Editor for Cactus Moon Publications, LLC

A Tale of Two Kingdoms

Once upon a time two kingdoms fought furiously over a garden, rich with beauty.

On this land grew the most beautiful flowers, vivid colors seemingly floating from their petals. Artists, displaying their creations while the peasants basked in their message and story, dropping gold pieces into their baskets to show appreciation. Many peasants would visit this garden to escape their mundane lives and soak in the deep blue pond while admiring their surroundings.

Two Kings saw the value of this garden and sought to take it for themselves and their subjects. If one King could seize control over this garden and the artists dwelling within, they could charge peasants pieces of gold to enter. Keeping a margin of this gold for themselves and with the rest of the gold, lure the artists to swear fealty.

King Conglomerate approached the artists in the garden and said, “We are in a better position to service the peasants when they enter. We will ask for less gold thus attracting more peasants paying to enter. With so much gold, our kingdom will be far more luxurious and we will pay the artists more gold as well.”

The artists were tempted by this King. Truly, more gold and a large kingdom would bring more peasants to enjoy their art. The artists gladly swore fealty.

King Conglomerate began to charge the peasants as they entered the garden. Many peasants questioned this and asked why they must pay to enter. King Conglomerate advised they no longer have to pay the artists as the king now pays them a royalty to display their art. Some peasants willingly accepted, paying gold and entering the garden.

Some peasants felt this unfair to their favorite artists. “Why should we pay you, King Conglomerate? We owe you no fealty.” They gathered to confer and find a way to challenge King Conglomerate.

They sought another King for advice. King Independent, or ‘Indie’ as he is known, heard the peasants. King Independent thought to himself, “So, King Conglomerate has taken control of the garden. I shall challenge him to a battle. I too have interest in this garden’s gold.” Stroking his long beard, he began to scheme.

King Indie paid his gold piece to enter the garden. He saw the artists painting and writing, some read aloud to a group of peasants. He approached an artist whose peasant gathering seemed the largest. “Your painting is beautiful but why are your colors less vivid than I remember?”

“My lord, King Conglomerate has taken our baskets. I thought I would make more gold by swearing fealty to this King. But alas, I have to share my gold with the King and I can no longer buy the most quality paints.”

This angered King Indie. This popular artist should not be making the same pittance as the other, less popular artists. He decided he must fight King Conglomerate for the most popular artists. They should not have their gold taken from them and now the colors are no longer bright. In truth, as King Indie looked around him, he saw the garden was no longer as vivid and thriving as before.

King Indie gathered his loyal subjects including the artist from the garden. “Today I shall declare war on King Conglomerate. We will battle him here in the garden.”

King Indie’s army still being small, he recruited peasants. King Indie and his subjects began to tell the peasants of King Conglomerate’s evil scheme to take gold from the most popular artists. King Indie accused King Conglomerate of lying to the peasants when he said all would benefit from the gold being made by the King. Many peasants noticed the garden in decline and their favorite artists making less gold, thus less beauty and chose to fight with King Indie’s army.

In the garden the battle raged. Many peasants could see how this battle destroyed their beautiful garden of retreat and the artists no longer displayed their beauty to give them  relief. They only wanted gold.

King Indie laid a siege around the garden, not allowing his subjects to display their art or loyal peasants to pay their gold to enter. King Indie told them that King Conglomerate ruined the garden and his subjects should have nothing to do with peasants or other artists wanting to enter the garden. King Indie declared that he could better serve the peasants and the artists. Therefore, none of his loyal subjects should entertain the idea of entering the garden even to see the artists who have not sworn fealty to either King.

Thus, a horrible divide occurred in the artist community. Soon, they fought among themselves, forming groups swearing a fealty to one or the other King. The divide became a crevice as more and more artists were forced to swear fealty to a King in order to earn  gold pieces.

The crevice widened into a deep chasm. On either side were loyal peasants and artists swearing fealty to King Conglomerate or King Indie.

This battle rages madly to this day. Artists swearing fealty to whichever King will give them more gold pieces.

While many of the peasants lamented the loss of their garden, they couldn’t agree about which King was responsible and which King to swear fealty. Some peasants completely abandoned the garden to follow their favorite artists. They saw no hope for the lost garden so they chose to follow their favorite artists and swear fealty to the artist’s King.

For many peasants, this war disheartened them. The garden, still controlled by both Kings, is no longer the beautiful, peaceful place it once had been.

The disheartened peasants chose to leave the garden entirely. They would build their own garden and no longer allow fealty to either King. This garden would be for the artists to once again create their beauty. To give the peasants the escape they seek and artists can display a basket where the peasants can choose to give them gold. No King to make demands and no artists to service only the peasants loyal to either King.

This beautiful garden is forming again with peasants and artists refusing to swear fealty to either King. As more artists enter this garden, more peasants are drawn to the pleasure and escape this garden offered before the war.

The Art of Storytelling

Open book. Indians sit at wigwam on pages of open book. Adventure story

Storytelling has been buried under so much commercialization, the art itself is lost…even to the writer.

Melissa, editor for Revisions and Edits, and I were discussing how stories have been told generation after generation. Stories that have never made it into a book and often, the author is unknown. No doubt those stories are a compilation, a story evolving over each generation but rich, nonetheless.

Storytelling was used by our Ancestors for more than the passage of wisdom. Stories provided entertainment for the children during particularly difficult seasons and illnesses. Providing the lyrics when told through music.

Imagining a life in tribal days, there had to be some storytellers whose talent made stories more compelling. The tribal actors, telling stories through shape-shifting into various characters.Some storytellers undoubtedly drew more of an audience than others.

Even today, stories provide endless entertainment and storytelling is big business.

As a publisher, I am often torn between the storyteller and writing ability. Some of the best storytellers are the worst writers. I can be a difficult task, pulling the story from deep within, putting it to paper.

This is why CMP has collaborative editors. As a young publisher, we work with budding authors and require talented, intuitive editors to help bring the story to life. Finally, we require talented illustrators to capture the story’s image. A perfect pyramid in today’s model of storytelling. The author, editor, and illustrator.

Not every storyteller is a talented writer, conversely, not every writer is a talented storyteller. In CMP’s mind, the storytelling-pyramid is an act of reciprocation. We utilize everyone’s particular talent, sharing in the storyteller’s vision, enhancing the story through collaboration on the final manifestation…the novel. Working together, the author can hone the art of storytelling.

Storytelling being a timeless art, may manifest one way today and another in the future. When a writer sets pen to paper, there should be an intention for the story. If the intention is simply – I want to publish a book… this becomes the goal. Sales may be weak since the goal has been accomplished, no thought for beyond.

When writing a story, imagine this story being read more than one-hundred years later. Maybe the story is so compelling that it continues as a legacy for future generations…The Scarlet Letter is just one example of a story still being told over two hundred years later.

If the intention is to be a storyteller, write a compelling story that can be read for centuries and watch  its value grow organically. Your intention provided the fuel to catapult the story into the cosmos. Of course, accelerants will be required. Social media, events, networking…that is just an aspect of the storytelling industry.

This doesn’t mean that in this century, the story will gain the notoriety hoped for. There is never a guarantee because genres come in and out of season. Remember author, James Allen? He wrote As a Man Thinketh in 1912. I don’t know the intention behind his writing but the book has been reprinted and is  given to salesmen by one company as a motivational tool. Over one hundred years later.

Anyone can write, but storytelling is an art.